The future is now, GNOME Shell is here

That’s actually an unstable project but the next GNOME release could let the user to transform web sites in stand alone applications with no UI chrome for browsing controls.

The proposed sample uses the Twitter service, resulting in a single window with its own title bar and the whole space with the website content, no more hassle or distractions. The navigation would remain confined inside the saved domain while external links would be opened in a separated browser instance.

I’m falling in love for it ❤

Read more: http://blogs.gnome.org/xan/2011/08/31/web-application-mode-in-gnome-3-2/

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The trash iconMany users prefer to adopt the desktop behavior like in GNOME 2 or others operating systems so they can still enable the classic desktop as seen on the previous article.

Like the disks volume icons also the trash icon can be hidden or shown again if needed by executing a simple command. To hide the trash icon you can execute the following command inside a terminal window:

gsettings set org.gnome.nautilus.desktop trash-icon-visible false

To show the trash icon again you can execute:

gsettings set org.gnome.nautilus.desktop trash-icon-visible true

The change is permanent and immediate so doesn’t require any restart.

The icons on the desktopMany users prefer to adopt the desktop behavior like in GNOME 2 or others operating systems so they can still enable the classic desktop as seen on the previous article.

However, when the desktop is enabled, many icons will appear, polluting and reducing the free space.

We can hide, and show again if wanted, the icons for the disks volume by executing a simple command. To hide the volumes icons you can just execute inside a terminal (in a single line):

gsettings set org.gnome.nautilus.desktop volumes-visible false

To show the icons again you can execute:

gsettings set org.gnome.nautilus.desktop volumes-visible true

The change is permanent and immediate so doesn’t require any restart.

The desktop

Clean DesktopSurely the very first thing you notice when you approach to the GNOME 3 is an empty desktop. Just a wallpaper background, no icons at all and, as you’ll soon discover, no pop-up menu if you right click on the desktop background.

If you’ve ever tried to save some files in the desktop folder (the exact folder name depends from the distribution, sometimes is called Desktop, sometimes is translated in your language like Escritorio, Scrivania or similar names) you could have found that your files won’t be shown in the desktop, like if it’s dead, unusable for everything.

Indeed the whole classic desktop in GNOME 3 should be considered as deprecated but many users aren’t still ready to abandon it so we’ll see here how to get the classic desktop back .

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The application switcherAnother way to move between the windows is using the Application switcher, a popup window which appears using the default shortcut keys ALT+TAB. Its usage requires to keep the ALT key pressed and press the TAB key multiple times to move between the applications.

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Many applications are runningWhen multiple windows are opened the desktop can soon become a mess, fulfilled with many windows covering the others and to find your application can be really frustrating. The GNOME Shell offers multiple possibilities to help the user to handle multiple windows.

The absence of a classic windows list like in others desktop environments could initially make you feel lost, it’s never easy to change your habits. After years of MS Windows, Apple OS X, GNOME and KDE the new GNOME Shell solution will surely appear unfriendly to adopt but after the initial approach it should you result really simple and natural.

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